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Overlapping Interests - Kodak Instamatic 500 with AGFA ASP 400S


The film in question is 35 mm unsprocketed intended for traffic surveillance. 

I've modded my Kodak Instamatic 500 to accept unsprocketed film in the 126 cassettes. This was done by cutting off the feeler peg that usually finds each sprocketed exposure on the original films. It's my second time exposing non-native film in a Insta 500 and the results are similar - overlapping frames. But the results were not so bad.


Well, it depends on your intentions.


I wanted to see if I could use the unsprocketed film in the 126 cassettes. And that I could. I just have to advance the film twice for each exposure, to not end up with overlapping exposures. And in the process expose the first of those in the palm of my hand or something.


 The lens is just wonderful! Its so sharp! Actually I have modded one to fit my M39 mount cameras.


One bonus feature which occured when I cut off the sprocket feeler peg was that the camera is 'ready' to expose after each wind. Normally an Instamatic is wound until you see the no. 1 marking on the backing paper, because that's where the first sprocket is situated (as in the 110 film cassettes). Now I can load the cassette with more film and place the film earlier in the cassette/fasten it on the backing paper.



Here you can see the exposure latitude of the film. It is marketed to have an extreme latitude, needed to spot details in any situation in traffic surveillance.



Welcome to my Instagram ourbooksmalmo and my Etsy shop gOBphoto, which is filled with old cameras and their accessories.

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